Gad Klein, Ph.D.

Gad E. Klein, Ph.D., is a neuropsychologist who specializes in the cognitive aspects of various neurological disorders including epilepsy, movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, as well as brain tumors and dementia. He also evaluates the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of traumatic brain injury and stroke. Dr. Klein is also an expert in advanced neuro-imaging techniques such as functional MRI, as well as the intracarotid amobarbital test (Wada test) and electrocortical stimulation mapping. These procedures enable accurate brain localization of motor and sensory function, as well as higher-order cognitive functions such as language and memory in order to minimize post-surgical functional deficits in patients undergoing brain surgery.

Dr. Klein received his undergraduate degree in psychology from Yeshiva University in New York, NY. He received his doctorate in neuropsychology from the CUNY Graduate Center and went on to complete an internship in clinical neuropsychology at the North Shore-LIJ Health System. Following this he completed a two year postdoctoral fellowship at the LIJ Epilepsy Center focusing on the neuropsychological aspects of epilepsy and functional neurosurgery. During this period he also received advanced training in functional neuro-imaging at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

Dr. Klein has conducted research studies exploring the use of functional MRI for localization of language function in the brain and to help find biomarkers of affective disorders in patients with epilepsy and depression. He has published numerous articles in peer reviewed journals in both cognitive and molecular neuroscience. Dr. Klein is a member of the International Neuropsychological Society, American Psychological Association – Neuropsychology Division, American Epilepsy Society, and Society for Neuroscience.

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HIGH SCHOOL sweethearts Donald and Melanie Squire of East Northport had just returned home from a relaxing vacation in Aruba. But the couple became concerned when Donald’s eye began to twitch uncontrollably and he experienced a loss of peripheral vision. Suspecting a possible stroke, Melanie, an ICU nurse at Huntington Hospital, called 9-1-1. Donald was…


With football-related concussions on the rise in high school sports, the I-Team set out to find out what kind of helmets schools in the tri-state use and how they measure in a ranking that evaluates the likeliness of football helmets to reduce concussion risk. Pei-Size Cheng reports.


It’s a normal part of aging to occasionally forget where you left your glasses or car keys. Not so with Alzheimer’s disease. “Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive decline in function along with personality changes,” said Gad Klein, PhD, a neuropsychologist with Neurological Surgery, P.C., in Rockville Centre. Read the article.